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Paediatric procedural sedation at a tertiary care university teaching hospital in India

Authors:

Anagha Dubhashi ,

Goa Medical College, India, IN
About Anagha
Goa Medical College, India
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Maria Silveira,

Goa Medical College, India, IN
About Maria
Goa Medical College, India
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Kiran Hebbar,

Children's Healthcare of Atlanta at Egleston, Emory University School of Medicine Atlanta, USA, US
About Kiran
Children's Healthcare of Atlanta at Egleston, Emory University School of Medicine Atlanta, USA
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Courtney McCracken,

Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, USA, US
About Courtney
Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, USA
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Pradip Kamat

Children's Healthcare of Atlanta at Egleston, Emory University School of Medicine Atlanta, USA,, US
About Pradip
Children's Healthcare of Atlanta at Egleston, Emory University School of Medicine Atlanta, USA,
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Abstract

Introduction: Although paediatric procedural sedation (PPS) using propofol is routine in the United States, its use is restricted to anaesthesiologists in many other countries like India. As a result the paediatric providers have to use other drugs for PPS.

Objective: To report a single centre experience of children receiving PPS at a tertiary care university teaching hospital. 

Method: A retrospective chart review of PPS at Goa Medical College, Goa, India was provided by the paediatric senior resident, supervised by a paediatric consultant, both certified in Paediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) and with experience in non-propofol PPS. We collected demographics, drug and dosing information, indication for PPS, procedure success rates and adverse events. Sedation related minor adverse events are complications during PPS, which are easily handled, and not expected to be associated with any sequelae. Serious adverse events include aspiration, airway obstruction, laryngospasm, emergent anaesthesia consult, cardiac arrest and death.

Results:Procedural sedation from 249 children from April-September 2015 were included in this study. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) 138/249 (55.4%), computed tomography (CT) scan 61 (24.5%), electroencephalogram (EEG) 26 (10.4%) and other procedures 24 (9.6%). Median age was 22 months (25th – 75th: 12-36), 140 (56.2%) were female, and 227 (91.5%) were American Society of Anaesthesiologists Physical Status (ASA-PS) ≤III. 

Overall success was 213 (85.5%). Commonly used agents included intravenous (IV) midazolam 188 (75.5%), IV dexmedetomidine 37 (14.9%), and oral chloral hydrate 24 (9.6%). Ramsey sedation score of 3 or greater was achieved in 220 (88.4 %) sedation after adding a second drug. Serious adverse events were seen in 3 (1.2%) patients. Sedation related minor adverse effects included: change in heart rate (>25% from baseline) 47 (18.9%), oxygen desaturation (<90% for 30 seconds) 32 (12.9%), and agitation/delirium 52 (20.9%). Only 21 (8.4%) required oxygen.

Conclusion: Intravenous midazolam was the commonest agent used for procedural sedation at Goa Medical College, India. 

Sri Lanka Journal of Child Health, 2018; 47(1): 8-15

How to Cite: Dubhashi, A., Silveira, M., Hebbar, K., McCracken, C. and Kamat, P., 2018. Paediatric procedural sedation at a tertiary care university teaching hospital in India. Sri Lanka Journal of Child Health, 47(1), pp.8–15. DOI: http://doi.org/10.4038/sljch.v47i1.8423
Published on 05 Mar 2018.
Peer Reviewed

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